Monthly Archives: July 2013

The Good Ol’ Days of Labor Strikes

If it seems like it’s been a really long time since anyone has seen a good labor strike, that’s because it has been. Here’s some charts that show just how dramatic and how long it’s been since Labor Strikes have … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Sociology, Wages | Leave a comment

The Future Shrinking Supply of Fire Fighters

While I work on Slutsky’s Labor Supply model for my “Slave Wage” paper, the model never addresses “other” motivators for working; such as having a pension at the end of a career. Enter Detroit and the slew of fire fighters … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Public Policy, Sociology | Leave a comment

The Sociology & Macroeconomics of Poopy Diapers

I’m remembering (fondly) Dr. Paul Krugman’s book “End This Depression Now”, as I read this story about a study of poor single parents in America not being able to afford diapers. According to the Johns Hopkins study, not being able … Continue reading

Posted in Macroeconomics, Poverty, Sociology | Leave a comment

McMinimum Wage (Self Indulgent)

I’m actually working on raw numbers to tie slavery to Economics for a journal article, with the idea that it’s not the AMOUNT of wages people earn but the socioeconomic effects that determines if “slave” conditions exist. And then I … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Poverty is an Equal Opportunity Discriminator

Statistics don’t always give us a complete picture of Social Facts. Sometimes they give us unique angles to look at Social Facts. So is a recent survey by the Associated Press that says 80% of Americans are financially insecure. The … Continue reading

Posted in Political Economy, Race, Wages | Leave a comment

The Rich Guy’s Stigma and Derp

I have nothing against rich guys (or gals). I’ve known a few over the years. Some were good and some were bad. I certainly have nothing against Capitalism other than it needs tweaking (and regulation) to make it equal for … Continue reading

Posted in Political Economy, Sociology | Leave a comment

Karl Marx & the Great Beyond

I peruse through the many Grad School catalogs that end up in my inbox when I have nothing better to do, As a Sociology guy focused on Political Economy, I notice that Economics Departments have one big thing in common … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Political Economy, Sociology | Leave a comment

Income Inequality a-la Minsky & Stiglitz: The Canadian Version

The Social structural argument to the economy is do we first fix income inequality before fixing unemployment or the opposite? It’s disappointing to have few Sociologists weigh in, so we have to rely on the Economists. This question is the … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Sociology, Wages | Leave a comment

Keynes & the Reincarnation of Adam Smith

Dr. Paul Krugman has a great take of how classical macroeconomic theory (al-a-Kenyes) can, and has described, as well as prescribed our current economic problems since 2008. He uses models from Irving Fisher (1933) and Keynes (1936). However, I think … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

With Notably Rare Exception

Regardless of what anyone thinks about the Federal Reserve and its policies, it had three mandates: control inflation (stabilize prices), maximize employment, and moderate long term interest rates. While I was working on some data from the World Bank on … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Politics | Leave a comment