Category Archives: Politics

After the Fall: A Post Trump-ist Society

This is an image from the Chicago Tribune that is indelibly burned into my mind. Yet as much as Trump is analyzed, the true object to think about is not the man, but the people. Win or lose, the people … Continue reading

Posted in Political Economy, Politics, Sociology | Leave a comment

Canada’s Unhealthy Obsession with a Balanced Budget

Canada is in the middle of both an election, and a recession. Why Canada is in a recession is obvious, and clear. What is not as clear is why Canada remains obsessed with having a “balanced” budget when it’s obvious … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Political Economy, Politics, Public Policy, Socioeconomics | Leave a comment

Sociology’s Internal Conflict: Obstacles and the Publics

In my last post, I discussed some of the problems facing the field of economics, and their contrast to the field of quasi-economic sociology. I also took a swipe at Sociology. I came upon this question: Why aren’t there Sociologists … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Theory, Political Economy, Politics, Public Policy, Sociological Theory, Sociology | Leave a comment

The Confederate Flag as a Symbol of Failure: Racism by the Numbers

I don’t have much to add to the thought-provoking social discussion surrounding the tragedy in Charleston, S.C.; both the shootings and the Confederate Flag debate. Missing from all the discussions however is that racism is NOT just a matter of … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Labor, Political Economy, Politics, Race, Slavery, Sociology | Leave a comment

The Super of the Super Powers

Over at Bloomberg View, Noah Smith cites the possibility that Canada has the ability to be the next great superpower., given its natural resources, political institutions and immigration system, if only Canada had a larger population. He does however, paint … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Macroeconomics, Political Economy, Politics, Public Policy | Leave a comment

Wage Slavery, Veterans, and Girl Scout Cookies

It seems unlikely that Wage Slavery, Veterans and Girls Scout cookies would go together, but I think that they do. USA Today reports that Ted Cruz’s grand idea to pay for services to Veterans who gave their lives in the … Continue reading

Posted in Labor, Political Economy, Politics, Poverty, Slavery, Socioeconomics | Leave a comment

Baltimore: A City Near You (Committing Sociology)

The Justice Policy Institute (PDF) has put together some really interesting facts on Baltimore from Census data. While the facts are shocking to most (or at least should be), the fact not mentioned is that Baltimore is just like the east … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Health, Political Economy, Politics, Poverty, Public Policy, Race, Socioeconomics | Leave a comment

The Tragedy of Success

Germany’s Parliament agreed to continue to bailout Greece for the next four months. However, in this process, the socioeconomic tone-deafness of Berlin became, well, deafening. From accusations that Greece is trying to dictate the Eurozone’s future, to calling Greece a … Continue reading

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In Economics, It’s Human Nature to Poop Our Pants

Nobel prize wining Economist, Robert Schiller is wondering why the general public hates economists so much, and attempts (poorly) to blame the public. He writes: “One reason may be the perception that many economists were smugly promoting the ‘efficient markets … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Labor, Political Economy, Politics, Public Policy, Sociology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

If Tar Sands Aren’t Sustainable Then Neither is Keystone

The Alberta Tar Sands in Canada that are creating all sorts of controversies in the U.S. over the building of the Keystone Pipeline are not sustainable, but for reasons few people think of. They are not economically sustainable. Consider this … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Environment, Markets, Politics, Public Policy | Leave a comment